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Where Love is, There God is Also by Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy

Posted by donatien at August 7, 2016, 4:01 pm in Ebooks » Short Stories

SCREENSHOT

Written by one of the world's most famous and beloved storytellers, this attractively packaged book includes three tales: Where Love Is, There God Is Also, The Hermits, and What Men Live By.
Tolstoy is best known for his classic works, War and Peace and Anna Karenina.


EXCERPT


In the city lived the shoemaker, Martuin Avdyeitch. He lived in a basement, in a little room with one window. The window looked out on the street. Through the window he used to watch the people passing by; although only their feet could be seen, yet by the boots, Martuin Avdyeitch recognized the people. Martuin Avdyeitch had lived long in one place, and had many acquaintances. Few pairs of boots in his district had not been in his hands once and again. Some he would half-sole, some he would patch, some he would stitch around, and... read more

Programming of Life 2: Earth

Posted by donatien at December 5, 2015, 8:41 pm in Movies » Documentary - Conspiracy

SCREENSHOT

The Earth is an extremely complex and uniquely programmed planet. The smallest degree of change could cause significant effects on us and our surroundings. The distance between the earth and the sun; the levels of oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen in the air; the angle and speed of the earth’s rotation; gravitational force; atmospheric pressure and the list goes on. If any of these parameters were to change, even slightly, earth would not be the planet we know today. We’re living on the most unique and robust planet in the entire universe and the more we research the more we discover just how much of a razor’s edge we’re really on. Join us as we explore... read more

From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne

Posted by donatien at June 16, 2015, 8:52 pm in Ebooks » Science Fiction

SCREENSHOT

One of the earliest examples of literature written in the science fiction genre, From the Earth to the Moon is a part of the Voyages Extraordinaires series by French novelist Jules Verne. Written more than a century before the Apollo mission, Verne’s classic is somewhat a prophetic novel of man’s travel to the moon with its thorough and descriptive detail. A remarkable blend of action, humor, science, and audacious schemes, the timeless classic is sure to fascinate with its unique vision of lunar exploration.

The story unfolds at the Baltimore Gun Club, a society of American Civil War veterans and weapon enthusiasts, who are in the midst of adjusting to a post-war environment and left feeling superfluous. During deliberations on how to deal with the declining need for artillery, club president Impey Barbicane puts forward his idea to build a giant cannon and launch a projectile to the moon. After the initial chaos the proposal causes, the members of the club... read more

Carnacki, the Ghost Finder by William Hope Hodgson

Posted by donatien at January 23, 2015, 7:59 pm in Ebooks » Short Stories

SCREENSHOT

Carnacki, the Ghost-Finder is a collection of supernatural detective short stories by author William Hope Hodgson. It was first published in 1913 by the English publisher Eveleigh Nash. In 1947, a new edition of 3,050 copies was published by Mycroft & Moran and included three additional stories. The Mycroft & Moran version is listed as No. 52 in Queen's Quorum: A History of the Detective-Crime Short Story As Revealed by the 100 Most Important Books Published in this Field Since 1845 by Ellery Queen.



EXCERPT


THE GATEWAY OF THE MONSTER

In response to Carnacki's usual card of invitation to have dinner and listen to a story, I arrived promptly at 427, Cheyne Walk, to find the three others who were always invited to these happy little times, there before me. Five minutes later, Carnacki, Arkright, Jessop, Taylor, and I were all engaged in the "pleasant occupation" of dining.

"You've not been long away, this time," I remarked, as I finished my soup; forgetting momentarily Carnacki's dislike of being asked even to skirt the borders of his story until such time as he was ready. Then he would not stint words.... read more

Interstellar Flight

Posted by donatien at November 20, 2014, 10:00 pm in Movies » Documentary - Science

SCREENSHOT

Pandora is the idyllic blue world featured in the movie Avatar. Its location is a real place: Alpha Centauri. It is a three-star solar system 4.37 light years from Earth, the nearest neighbors of our Sun. A planet has recently been detected in the system, which raises the questions of when and how we will make our first efforts to reach this planet, or some other (relatively) nearby planet, to expand the horizons of the human race. Interstellar Flight takes us through current theories of just how we are hypothesizing doing so.

To date, 3841 planets in the near regions of our galaxy have been identified as potential settlement options, about 1100 of which are confirmed. Most are Jupiter and Neptune-sized planets that orbit close to their corresponding stars. Estimates on the number of Earth-sized planets that could possibly support life in our galaxy fall around nine billion.

The film then turns to the actual distance between us and Alpha Centauri, which ... read more

The Beetle: A Mystery by Richard Marsh

Posted by donatien at October 3, 2014, 8:19 pm in Ebooks » Mystery - Detective

SCREENSHOT

A fantastic creature, "born of neither god nor man," hypnotic and supernatural, stalks British politician Paul Lessingham through turn-of-the-century London. A classic tale of supernatural horror.

Richard Marsh (1857-1915) was the pseudonym of the British author born Richard Bernard Heldmann. He is best known for his supernatural thriller The Beetle: A Mystery, published in the same year as Bram Stoker's Dracula and initially even more popular. The Beetle remained in print until 1960, and was subsequently resurrected in 2004 and 2007. Heldman was educated at Eton and Oxford University. He began to publish short stories, mostly adventure tales, as "Bernard Heldmann," before adopting the name "Richard Marsh" in 1893. Several of the prolific Marsh's novels were published posthumously.


EXCERPT


'No room!—Full up!'

He banged the door in my face.

That was the final blow.

To have tramped about all day looking for work; to have begged even for a job which would give me money enough to buy a little food; and to have tramped and to have begged in vain,—that was bad. But, sick at heart, depressed in mind and in body, exhausted by hunger and fatigue, to have been compelled to pocket any little pride I might have left, and solicit, as the penniless, homeless tramp which indeed I was, a night's lodging in the casual ward,— and to solicit it in vain!—that was worse. Much worse. About as bad as bad could be.... read more

Hidden Secrets of Money

Posted by donatien at September 7, 2014, 4:29 pm in Movies » Documentary - Economics

SCREENSHOT

Money is just an instrument for buying your time. It's a canister to hold your financial power until you're prepared and comfortable enough to re-distribute it or use it. But the whole world has been alienated from the actual money and has been tricked into utilizing a currency - a dishonest fraud that is quietly depriving you from your two most important assets.

We are spiraling into an era of economic catastrophe that is the most extreme the world has ever seen. The affluence relocation that will happen in this decade will be the biggest one in history. Actually wealth is never lost, it is only shifted. And that means that on the other side of every catastrophe there is a moment of opportunity.

The good news is that all you have to accomplish to change this crisis into your favor is to educate yourself. The greatest investment that you can make in your life is... read more

The Lost Kafoozalum by Pauline Ashwell

Posted by donatien at August 21, 2014, 9:09 pm in Ebooks » Science Fiction

SCREENSHOT

One of the beautiful things about a delusion is that no matter how
mad someone gets at it ... he can't do it any harm. Therefore a delusion
can be a fine thing for prodding angry belligerents....

EXCERPT

I remember some bad times, most of them back home on Excenus 23; the worst was when Dad fell under the reaping machine but there was also the one when I got lost twenty miles from home with a dud radio, at the age of twelve; and the one when Uncle Charlie caught me practicing emergency turns in a helicar round the main weather-maker; and... read more

Alias the Lone Wolf by Louis Joseph Vance

Posted by donatien at August 19, 2014, 8:25 pm in Ebooks » Mystery - Detective

SCREENSHOT

The super crook in "The Lone Wolf," the object of fiendish vengeance in "The False Faces," and the clever secret service man in "The Red Masquerade" now has his most thrilling adventure as a gentleman adventurer who pits his wits against a ruthless schemer to save an innocent man framed for burglary.

EXCERPT

Through the suave, warm radiance of that afternoon of Spring in England a gentleman of modest and commonly amiable deportment bore a rueful countenance down Piccadilly and into Halfmoon street, where presently he introduced it to one whom he found awaiting him in his lodgings, much at ease in his easiest chair, making free with his whiskey and tobacco, and reading a slender brown volume selected from his shelves.

This dégagé person was patently an Englishman, though there were traces of Oriental ancestry in his cast. The other, he of the doleful habit, was as unmistakably of Gallic pattern, though he dressed and carried himself in a thoroughly Anglo-Saxon fashion, and... read more

Join Our Gang? by Sterling E. Lanier

Posted by donatien at August 18, 2014, 11:11 pm in Ebooks » Short Stories

SCREENSHOT

Sterling Edmund Lanier (December 18, 1927 – June 28, 2007) was an American editor, science fiction author and sculptor. He is perhaps known best as the editor who championed the publication of Frank Herbert’s bestselling novel Dune.

JOIN
OUR GANG?

They didn't exactly hold a gun at anybody's head; all they offered was help. Of course, they did sort of encourage people to ask for help....

EXCERPT

Commander William Powers, subleader of Survey Group Sirian Combine—1027798 and hence first officer of its ship, the Benefactor, stared coldly out of his cabin port. The Benefactor was resting on the bedrock of Island Twenty-seven of the world called Mureess by its natives. Like all the other such names, it meant "the world," just as the natives' name for themselves, Falsethsa, meant "the people," or "us," or "the only race." To Commander Powers, fifty years old, with eleven of them in Survey work, the world was Planet Two of a star called something unpronounceable in the nebula of something else equally pointless. He had not bothered to learn the native name of Island Twenty-seven, because his ship had mapped one thousand three hundred and eighty-six islands, all small, and either rocky or swampy or both. Island Twenty-seven, to him, had only one importance, and ... read more

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